THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE

 

Social Welfare 843:

Strengthening Staff Performance in a Diverse Workplace

 

Spring 2006

 

Judy L. Postmus, Ph.D., ACSW

Thursdays, 6:10-8:50pm

 

Office: 120 Twente

Room: Edwards RC 230

 

Phone: 864-2647

Line #60827

 

E-mail: postmus@ku.edu

 

Office Hours: Thursdays, 5-6pm and by appointment

 

 

Course Rationale

 

Social workers in administrative and advocacy practice help to create a society in which basic human needs are met and the strengths of individuals, families, households, and communities can emerge and grow. Effective administrative and advocacy social work practice demands knowledge, skills, and abilities in the areas of personnel management, team building, and workplace diversity. Social work agencies and programs must be administered by people with human resource expertise in order to meet the needs of clients and communities, and to build upon strengths and enhance well-being of individuals, families, households, and communities. Additionally, good advocacy practice requires solid communication and team building skills to effectively develop coalitions among individuals and communities.

 

Consistent with the goals of this course, students who successfully complete the class will be able to: (1) supervise and manage social workers and other human service staff members (2) build teams and organizational cultures that maximize staff morale and job satisfaction and (3) create and maintain workplaces that reflect, contribute to, and celebrate diversity in the larger community. The class also includes a historical orientation to and a comparison of various theoretical perspectives on personnel management and related administrative work in human service agencies.

 

Students in this course will focus on building knowledge, skills, and abilities that are consistent with an understanding of best practices based on empirical literature regarding maximizing client and community well-being through social work administrative practice. Thus, secondary research using the findings from research studies published in scholarly journals is one key to success in this class. Learning how to stay up-to-date with research on service effectiveness in one's area of interest is central to successful administrative practice in social work.

 

The course will also contribute in several ways to students' advocacy skills. First, it has long been recognized that well managed advocacy organizations are a very powerful tool to bring about change and reduce social injustice. The personnel management skills taught in this course are as equally applicable to advocacy organizations as they are to organizations providing direct services. Second, developing and managing teams, either from the inside or outside of the organization, is a common advocacy objective because teams and coalitions are most often the vehicle through which policy changes are enacted.

 

Throughout the course students are helped to connect their classroom work and their field work in administrative practice. More specifically, the class focuses on the fact that the most important and expensive resource in any human service setting is the increasingly diverse group of people who work to enhance the well-being of clients and communities.

 

This class is most closely linked to the program design, financial management, and assessing outcomes courses within the social work administration concentration. It builds on the foundation level policy, human behavior, practice, and research courses to advance our administrative abilities to value diversity, advocate for populations at risk, end oppression and discrimination, and promote social and economic justice.

 

Educational Outcomes

 

At the completion of the course, students will be able to:

 

  1. Describe the history, theoretical bases, and major aspects of personnel management in the human services.
  2. Supervise and manage social workers and other human service staff members
  3. by applying the core concepts of the strengths perspective and client-centered administrative practice.
  4. Build teams and organizational cultures that maximize staff morale and job satisfaction.
  5. Create and maintain workplaces that reflect, contribute to, and celebrate diversity in the larger community.
  6. Recruit, interview, and hire prospective staff members and volunteers; Write job descriptions and staff development plans; Evaluate staff performance.
  7. Use effective individual and group supervision approaches including administrative, educational and supportive supervision strategies.
  8. Demonstrate skills in using library, electronic, and writing resources in researching and analyzing best practices in administrative social work to enhance client and community well-being.
  9. Maximize the job satisfaction of staff members and volunteer through staff development, communication, the creation of a reward-based environment, and evaluation.
  10. Create and implement plans to enhance and maintain workforce diversity within human service settings with special attention to celebrating diversity based on age, sex, race, ethnicity, language, religion, sexual orientation, disability, and cultural background.
  11. Efectively prevent and/or manage turnover and related disruption that results from resignations, terminations, and retirements.
  12. Value justice and equity in tangible ways in all personnel management, team building, and workforce diversity decisions and endeavors.
  13. Utilize your knowledge of personnel management when advocating for clients, for staff, and for social justice.

 

All of the educational outcomes for this course tie to Social Work Administrative and Advocacy Concentration Objective #4 (Students will be able to supervise and manage social workers and other human service staff; build teams and organizational cultures that maximize staff morale and job satisfaction; create and maintain workplaces that reflect, contribute to, and celebrate diversity in the larger community.). In addition, educational outcomes 1 and 7 above help students achieve Administrative and Advocacy Concentration Objective #3 (Students will be expected to be knowledgeable about and bring a critical perspective to policies and effective interventions in their fields of practice and to acquire the abilities needed to remain abreast of this information.) and educational outcome 2 above helps students achieve Administrative Concentration and Advocacy Objective #7 (Students will be thoroughly familiar with the concept of client-centered administrative practice and will possess numerous skills needed to implement this approach).

 

Curriculum Themes

 

Practice Centered Curriculum - The personnel management, team building and workplace diversity course is practice centered in keeping with our school's curriculum theme. This course helps students develop secondary research and writing skills like those that they will use in practice as they analyze human resource management issues and challenges; staff member strengths and capacities; and effects of administrative practice on the social and economic well-being of clients and communities. Additional practice skills that students develop in this class enable them to: (1) supervise and manage social workers and other human service staff members (2) build teams and organizational cultures that maximize staff morale and job satisfaction and (3) create and maintain workplaces that reflect, contribute to, and celebrate diversity in the larger community. Our school's commitment to practice-centeredness is enhanced by the following themes in this course:

 

Strengths: In the personnel management, team building, and workforce diversity class, students learn to analyze human resource management issues from a perspective that recognizes and seeks to build upon the strengths and resources of individuals, families, neighborhoods, organizations, and communities. Students learn to identify strengths, capacities, and resources in workers, clients, and communities; and to research and implement human resource management changes that have the potential to positively affect social and economic well-being. In this way, the strengths perspective parallels client-centered administrative practice in our curriculum. Students learn how to build upon a foundation of already existing strengths, capacities, and resources in their social work administrative practice. Finally, students learn to mobilize new strengths, capacities, and resources from the larger environment to enhance existing strengths and to increase social and economic well-being.

 

Critical Perspective: Students in this course learn to critically analyze human resource management by examining competing: (1) theoretical perspectives about the relationships between various administrative practice strategies and social and economic well-being

(2) Assumptions that underlie administrative practice methods and strategies in the areas of personnel management, team building, and workforce diversity. An especially important part of the development of a critical perspective in this course is the thorough examination of underlying ideologies, theories, and assumptions regarding the interplay between social work administrative practice and the well-being of individuals, families, neighborhoods, organizations, and communities.

 

Social Justice: Social and economic justice is at the heart of the personnel management, team building, and workforce diversity course. Students in this course learn to analyze and respond to human resource issues and challenges with the goals of advocating for populations at risk, ending oppression and discrimination, and promoting social and economic justice. For example, the case studies that are assigned in this course focus on closing gaps in the social and economic resources available to different groups of workers, clients, and community members.

 

Diversity: Eradicating oppression and its particularly negative effects on our society's ability to value diversity on the bases of race, ethnicity, gender, class, disability, culture, age, religion, spirituality, and sexual orientation is central to our work together in this class. A key part of human resource management involves identifying how various administrative practice strategies and approaches have historically created and maintained advantage, or privilege, for some groups and cumulative disadvantage and oppression for other groups. Valuing diversity requires that social workers end institutionalized oppression in the form of discriminatory administrative practice, and that we build alternate organizational policies and practices that celebrate, affirm, and enhance the strengths, contributions, and social and economic well-being of diverse groups of workers, clients, and community members.

 

The Liberal Arts Perspective and Links with Other Courses in the Administrative Concentration

 

Determining what people need from their jobs, and finding ways to assist them in serving clients and communities well, requires knowledge about human behavior that has particularly deep theoretical and empirical roots in sociology, psychology, and economics. We build on the liberal arts with the knowledge that a particularly important element of personnel management is creating human service organizations that help to assure positive outcomes for clients and communities. Learning to manage human resources in this way draws heavily on concepts presented in the organizational and community foundation practice course and the program design course within the administrative concentration. A second important element of personnel management is the use of information to improve performance. This course applies, reinforces, and expands several concepts from the information management course. Finally, staff members of any agency are its most valuable and expensive resources, so this course is connected conceptually to budgeting, fiscal management, grant writing, and resource development classes.

 

Professional Purposes and Values

 

Given the multiple constituencies of any human service agency, there are frequent opportunities for value conflicts between the needs of clients, workers, the organization, and the larger community. Effective human resource management is achieved by balancing divergent individual and group goals and by aligning incentives for change appropriately. The values of justice, equity, and enhanced well-being are central to social work and to social work administration. Moreover, social workers and social work administrators affirm and celebrate human diversity as a key professional value.

 

Preparation for Practice with Diverse Populations

 

As the course title suggests, workforce diversity is a central concern of the content of this class. More specifically, in this course students learn how to create and maintain workplaces that reflect, contribute to, and celebrate diversity in the larger community.

Human diversity related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, religious affiliation, and disability are increasingly important considerations in personnel management. Discussions and readings regarding diversity throughout this course will highlight the role of the social work administrator in creating human service organizational cultures in which diversity is affirmed, valued, and celebrated.

 

Course Format

This course requires graduate level reading, writing, and analytical skills. Students are to come to each class prepared to actively participate in discussions about reading assignments and previous lecture materials. The papers will be graded both on substance and on the ability of the student to write succinctly and in terms understandable to a wide audience. All students are encouraged to participate through discussions in class, via e-mail discussions, or with the instructor during office hours.

 

During this course, it may be difficult to disguise references to specific organizations and people, so such information must stay in the classroom. Confidentiality is vital.

 

Respect for others in the classroom. Social work courses are often messy and ambiguous, with room for multiple and diverse perspectives. We all must attempt to treat each other with respect when opinions are shared. Language should be used which recognizes diversity and is respectful of others. It is also imperative, as we struggle with complex political, personal and social issues, that we not silence others by assuming that there are "politically correct" lines of thought that cannot be challenged. Let us attempt to struggle for intellectual growth and mutual respect as we endeavor in this process!

 

Attendance. Students are expected to attend class (and be on time), which is essential for learning skills, learning from lecture and class discussion and for socialization to the profession of social work. Attendance and participation will affect 10% of the course grade. Students who miss more than a total of 3 classes will not receive a passing grade for the class.

 

Blackboard. Blackboard is a course management program designed to aid in the communication and dissemination of course information and materials. These materials include the syllabus, assignments, and powerpoint handouts. Additionally, there are links to websites, an online gradebook, and opportunities to e-mail the instructor and your classmates (without knowing their e-mail address).

 

All correspondence, including submission of assignments and e-mail communications, will be conducted through Blackboard. Please ensure that the e-mail registered with the University is the e-mail you want to use for your correspondence. Should you have any questions or need to change your e-mail account, please contact the KU Computing Help Desk at 864-0200 or http://www.ku.edu/~helpdesk.

 

To find your course, go to http://courseware.ku.edu. The first time you log in to Blackboard, follow the instructions to et up an online ID (if necessary). For subsequent logins, go through these steps:

-      Click on login

-      Enter user name & password

-      When at your Bb main page, click on the course title.

 

There is a new version of the Student Guide available for Version 6 of Bb. You can get it here: http://www.ku.edu/~ids/docs/Blackboard_Student_Essentials.doc

 

Course Readings

-      Texts: The following required texts are available at the University Book Store:

Kettner, P.M. (2002). Achieving Excellence in the Management of Human Service Organizations. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

Weinbach, R.W. (2003). The Social Worker as Manager: A Practical Guide to Success (4th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

-     Reader Packet: A reader packet is required for this class. To access the readings, you may either retrieve them yourself or go to Blackboard. Articles & book chapters are organized by class session and in alphabetical order by author.

 

Assignments

There are five assignments for this course. More details are provided in the assignment folder on the Blackboard website. All assignments are to be electronically posted in the Digital Drop Box on Blackboard no later than 12:00pm on the due date. Please make sure that you "Send" your assignment; if you only "Add" the assignment, I will not be able to retrieve it. Once graded, I will post your assignment in the Digital Drop Box and then send an e-mail indicating that your graded paper is posted.

 

1)    Critical Reflections. Students will complete 2 small papers (3-5 pages) that critically reflect your understanding of the readings and your ability to apply them to your organization. These papers are due Feb. 2 and 9.

 

2)    Presentation on Readings. Throughout the semester, students will pair up with other classmates and train the class on the appropriate topic on the chosen date. The presentation will include the assigned readings along with at least 3 additional readings (peer-reviewed) per student presenter.

 

3)    Organizational Analysis. For this assignment, you will describe and analyze your organizational setting and context, setting the stage for the job analysis and performance appraisal process. The paper will be 7-8 pages long and is due February 16.

 

4)    Job Analysis, Description, & Recruitment and Interviewing Strategies. For this assignment, you will critically evaluate a specific job within your organization and conduct a job analysis, create a job description, and develop recruitment, and interviewing strategies. You are encouraged to choose a job related to your field practicum. The paper will be 8-10 pages long and is due either March 2 or 9. A sign-up sheet will be distributed in class for you to decide your due date.

 

      5)   Performance Evaluations. For this assignment, you will critically evaluate the performance appraisal process for a specific job within your organization and revise the process based on the job analysis and description. You are encouraged to choose a job that had a job analysis completed earlier in the semester. The paper will be 8-10 pages long and is due either April 27 or May 4. A sign-up sheet will be distributed in class for you to decide your due date.

 

Grading

 

Activity:

 

Value:

 

Due Date:

Class Participation & Attendance

 

10%

 

All Classes

Critical Reflections

 

10%

 

Feb. 2 and 9

Presentation on Readings

 

20%

 

Mar. 15, 30, April 6, 20, & 27

Organizational Analysis

 

20%

 

February 16

Job Analyses, Descriptions, & Recruitment Strategies

 

20%

 

March 2 or 9

Performance Evaluations

 

20%

 

April 27 or May 4

TOTAL:

 

100%

 

 

 

Grading for this MSW course is as follows:

95-100 =

A

 

84-86 =

B

 

74-76 =

C

90-94 =

A-

 

80-83 =

B-

 

70-73 =

C-

87-89 =

B+

 

77-79 =

C+

 

Below 70 =

Failed (F)

                                   

 

The quality of the writing as well as the content is important, so students should check spelling and grammar as well as sentence and paragraph construction. It is a very good idea to write a draft of your papers and then make an outline of your draft before preparing final versions. This helps assure that your paper is flowing in a coherent manner and that you are effectively making and supporting your main points.

 

Written work should meet basic standards of writing proficiency, and should conform to accepted standards of citation. The format found in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) should be used for all papers. If you are unsure of how to cite sources, please see the instructor. Remember that plagiarism is a serious offense and violates the standards for academic integrity. Written assignments are graded based on the following criteria:

 

-      thoroughness and completeness of content;

-      clarity and logic of presentation;

-      evidence of critical thought;

-      quality of writing.

 

Late Assignments: All assignments are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Grades will be reduced by 10 points if the assignment is late. Assignments will not be accepted one week past the due date unless otherwise discussed with the instructor. (Exceptions will be made only in extreme circumstances and must be approved by the instructor PRIOR to the due date.)

 

Incomplete grades: Incompletes will only be granted at the discretion of the instructor under special circumstances. It is the student's responsibility to request an Incomplete from the instructor before the end of the semester. A request signed by the student and the faculty member must be on file when grades are submitted.

 

Special Considerations

The staff of Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD), 135 Strong, 785-864-2620 (v/tty), coordinates accommodations and services for KU courses. If you have a disability for which you may request accommodation in KU classes and have not contacted them, please do as soon as possible. Please also see me privately in regard to this course. Students who will miss class because the university calendar conflicts with religious observations should notify the instructor so that assignments and course content for that class can be discussed in advance.

 

Inclement Weather Policy

In the event of inclement weather, students should call the University (785-864-SNOW) to see if classes have been cancelled. If the University is operating, the instructor will attend class. Students should contact the instructor if weather or driving conditions make it impossible for them to get to class so that accommodations can be made as necessary.

 

Audio & Video Taping Policy

 

As suggested by the University of Kansas, Faculty Executive Committee, "course materials prepared by the instructor, together with the content of all lectures and review sessions presented by the instructor are the property of the instructor. Video and audio recording of lectures and review sessions without the consent of the instructor is prohibited. On request, the instructor will usually grant permission for students to audio tape lectures, on the condition that these audio tapes are only used as a study aid by the individual making the recording. Unless explicit permission is obtained from the instructor, recordings of lectures and review sessions may not be modified and must not be transferred or transmitted to any other person, whether or not that individual is enrolled in the course."

 

Disruptive Behavior in the Classroom

As suggested by the University of Kansas, Faculty Executive Committee, "the scope and content of the material included in this course are defined by the instructor in consultation with the School of Social Welfare. While the orderly exchange of ideas, including questions and discussions prompted by lectures and discussion sessions, is viewed as a normal part of the educational environment, the instructor has the right to limit the scope and duration of these interactions. Students who engage in disruptive behavior, including persistent refusal to observe boundaries defined by the instructor regarding inappropriate talking, discussions, and questions in the classroom may be subject to discipline for non-academic misconduct for disruption of teaching or academic misconduct, as defined in the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (CSRR), Article 22, Section C, and the University Senate Rules and Regulations, Section 2.4.6. Article 22 of CSRR also defines potential sanctions for these types of infractions."

 

Evaluation

You are encouraged to provide me with feedback on the course content and format during each class session, as well as during my office hours: Are the material and concepts presented in a clear manner? Is adequate time being given to individual Topic? Are different learning styles being accommodated? An anonymous student evaluation will be given before the mid-point of the class to allow for changes or adjustments to the course content and structure. Formal evaluations of this course will also occur at the end of the semester.

 

Course Content and Reading Assignments

 

Session One:                        January 26, 2006

 

Topic:             Historical & Theoretical Foundations

Readings:       Weinbach, Chapters 1 & 3

 

Session Two:             February 2, 2006 – Critical Reflection Due

 

Topic:             Setting the Organizational Climate

Readings:       Kettner, Chapter 1

Weinbach, Chapter 2

 

Taylor, M. S., & Giannantonio, C. M. (1993). Forming, adapting, and terminating the employment relationship: A review of the literature from individual, organizational, and interactionist perspectives. Journal of Management, 19(2), p. 461 (443).

 


Session Three:         February 9, 2006 – Critical Reflection Due

 

Topic:             Creating & Managing Staff Diversity

Readings:       Weinbach, Chapter 5

 

Milliken, F. J., & Martins, L. L. (1996). Searching for common threads: Understanding the multiple effects of diversity in organizational groups. Academy of Management Review, 21(2), 402-403.

 

Mor Barak, M. (2000). The inclusive workplace: An ecosystems approach to diversity management. Social Work, 45(4), 339 (313).

 

Richard, O. C., & Johnson, N. B. (2001). Understanding the impact of human resource diversity practices on firm performance. Journal of Managerial Issues, 13(2), p. 177-195.

                       

Session Four:                        February 16, 2006 – Organizational Analysis Due

 

Topic:             Developing & Modifying Jobs, Job Descriptions, Job & Task Analysis

Readings:       Kettner, Chapter 10

 

Session Five:             February 23, 2006

 

Topic:             Recruiting & Selecting Staff People

Readings:       Kettner, Chapters 9 & 11

 

Bricout, J. C., & Bentley, K. J. (2000). Disability status and perceptions of employability by employers. Social Work Research, 24(2), p. 87 (13).

 

Greengard, S. (1995). Avoid negligent hiring: Are you well armed to screen applicants? Personnel Journal, 74(12), 84-95.

 

McGarvey, R. (1996). Good questions. Entrepreneur, 24(1), 87-89.

 

Petersen, T., Saporta, I., & Seidel, M. L. (2000) Offering a job: Meritocracy and

 social networks. The American Journal of Sociology, 106(3), p.763

 (44).

 

Session Six:              March 2, 2006 – Job Analysis Due (Group A)

 

Topic:             Training, Developing, and Delegating

Readings:         Kettner, Chapter 12

Weinbach, Chapters 4 & 8

 

Yukl, G. & Fu, P.P., (1999). Determinants of delegation and consultation by

managers. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 20, (2) p. 219 (13).

 

Session Seven:         March 9, 2006 - Job Analysis Due (Group B)

 

Topic:             Facilitating Communication & Team Building

Readings:      

 

Allen, N.E., Foster-Fishman, P.G. & Salem, D.A., (2002). Interagency Teams: A vehicle for service delivery reform. Journal of Community Psychology, 30 (5), p. 475 (22).

 

Glisson, C. & James, L.R., (2002). The cross-level effects of culture and climate in human service teams. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 24, (4) p. 357 (15).

 

Larkey, L. K. (1996). Toward a theory of communicative interactions in culturally diverse workgroups. Academy of Management Review, 21(2), p. 463 (429).

 

Session Eight:           March 16, 2006 – Presentation (Group 1)

 

Topic:             Motivating Staff, Enhancing Morale, & Increasing Job Satisfaction

Readings:       Kettner, Chapter 6 and Weinbach, Chapter 6.

 

Newstrom, J. W. (2002). Making work fun: An important role for managers. SAM Advanced Management Journal.

 

Poelmans, S., & Sahibzada, K. (2004). A multi-level model for studying the context and impact of work-family policies and culture in organizations. Human Resource Management Review, 14, 409-431.

 

Quay, S. E., & Quaglia, R. J. (2005). Eight ways to motivate your staff. Principal, 84, 40-42.

 

Session Nine:                       March 30, 2006 - Presentation (Group 2)

 

Topic:             Administrative, Educational, & Supportive Supervision

Readings:      

 

Brashears, F. (1995). Supervision as social work practice: A reconceptualization. Social Work, 40(5), p. 692-699.

 

Cohen, B.-Z. (1999). Intervention and supervision in strengths-based social work practice. Families in Society, 80(5), 460-471.

 

Yegdich, T. (1999). Lost in the crucible of supportive clinical supervision: Supervision is not therapy. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(5), 1265-1275.


Session Ten:             April 6, 2006 - Presentation (Group 3)

 

Topic:             Individual & Group Supervision

Readings:      

 

Bogo, M., Sussman, T., & Globerman, J. (2004). The field instructor as group worker: Managing trust and competition in group supervision. Journal of Social Work Education, 40(1), 13-26.

 

Brown, A. & Bourne, I. (1996). Group supervision, Chapter 9. The social work supervisor. Buckingham: Open University Press.                   

 

Milne, D. & Westerman, C. (2001). Evidence-based clinical supervision: Rationale and illustration. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy 8(6), p. 444 (13).            

 

Ramos-Sanchez, L., Esnil, E., Goodwin, A., Riggs, S., Touster, L. O., Wright, L. K., et al. (2002). Negative surpervisory events: Effects on supervision satisfaction and supervisory alliance. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 33(2), 197-202.

 

 

Session Eleven:        April 13, 2006

 

Topic:             Monitoring, Reviewing, & Evaluating Staff Performance

Readings:       Kettner, Chapter 13

Weinbach, Chapter 7.

 

Hartman, S. J., Fok, L. Y., Crow, S. M. & Payne, D. M. (1994). Males and females in a discipline situation: Exploratory research on competing hypotheses. Journal of Managerial Issues, 6(1), p. 54 (15).

 

Miller, J.S. & Cardy, R.L., (2000). Self-monitoring and performance appraisal: Rating outcomes in project teams. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 21, (6) p. 609 (17).

 

 

Session Twelve:        April 20, 2006 - Presentation (Group 4)

 

Topic:             Managing the Difficult Employee & Termination

Readings:       Weinbach, Chapter 7

Kettner, Chapter 13.

 

Fitness, Julie. (2000). Anger in the workplace: An emotion script approach to anger episodes between workers and their superiors, co-workers and subordinates. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 21, p. 147 (15).

 

 

Session Thirteen:    April 27, 2006 - Presentation (Group 5); Perf. Eval. Due (Group A)

 

Topic:             Preventing Burnout & Helping Staff Members Prepare for Retirement

Readings:       Weinbach, Chapter 11.

 

Julia, M., Kilty, K. M., & Richardson, V. (1995). Social worker preparedness for retirement: Gender and ethnic considerations. SocialWork, 40(5), 610-620.

 

Soderfeldt, M., Soderfeldt, B., & Warg, L.-E. (1995). Burnout in social work. Social Work, 40(5), 638-646.

 

 

Session Fourteen:    May 4, 2006 - Perf. Eval. Due (Group B)

 

Topic:             Leadership Styles & Becoming an Effective Manager

Readings:       Weinbach, Chapters 10

 

DiPadova, L. N. & Faerman, S.R., (1998). Managing Time. In Edwards, R.L., et.al (Eds.), Skills for effective management of nonprofit organizations (pp. 469- 491). Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers.

 

Herman, R. D., & Renz, D. O. (2004). Doing things right: Effectiveness in local nonprofit organizations, a panel study. Public Administration Review, 64(6), 694-704.

 

Lewis, A. W., & Fagenson-Eland, E. A. (1998). The influence of gender and organization level on perceptions of leadership behaviors: A self and supervisor comparison. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, 38(5/6), 479-502.

 

 

Session Fifteen:       May 11, 2006 Course Summary & Celebration

 

 


ADDITIONAL READING RESOURCES

 

Bartunek, J. M., Foster-Fishman, P. G., & Keys, C. B. (1996). Using Collaborative Advocacy to Foster Intergroup Cooperation: A Joint Insider-Outsider Investigation. Human Relations, 49(6), 701-733.

 

Bernard, J. M. & Goodyear, R. K. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision, 2nd ed.

Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Bowers, B., Esmond, S. & Canales, M. (1999). Approaches to case management

supervision. Administration in Social Work, 23 (1), 29-47.

 

Brashears, F. (1995). Supervision as social work practice: A reconceptualization. Social Work, 40(5), p. 692-699.

 

Bricout, J. C., & Bentley, K. J. (2000). Disability status and perceptions of employability by employers. Social Work Research, 24(2), p. 87 (13).

 

Browne, A., & Bourne, I. (1996). The social work supervisor (pp. 165-179). Buckingham: Open University Press.

 

Brown-Johnson, N., & Provan, K. G. (1995). The relationship between work/family benefits and earnings: a test of competing predictions. The Journal of Socio-Economics., 24(4), 571 (514).

 

Bulmer, M. & Solomos, J. (1999). Racism. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Condrey, S. E. (1995). Reforming human resource management systems: Exploring the

impact of organizational trust. American Review of Public Administration, 25, 341-

355.

 

Dominick, P. G., Reilly, R. R., & McGourty, J. W. (1997). The effects of peer feedback on team member behavior. Group & Organizational Management, 22(4), 508 (513).

 

Ely, R., J. , & Thomas, D. A. (2001). Cultural Diversity at Work: The Effects of Diversity Perspective on Work Group Processes and Outcomes. Administrative Science Quarterly, 46(2).

 

Erez, A., Lepine, J. A., & Elms, H. (2002). Effects of rotated leadership and peer evaluation on the functioning and effectiveness of self-managed teams: a quasi-experiment. Personnel Psychology, 55(4), 929 (920).

 

Erlich, J. L., Rothman, J. & Teresa, J. G. (1999). Taking action in organizations and

communities, 2nd ed. Dubuque, IA: Eddie Bowers Publishing.

 

Ezell, M., Menefee, D. & Patti, R. J. (1997). Factors influencing priorities in hospital social

work departments: A director's perspective. Social Work in Health Care, 26 (1), 25-40.

 

Ferris, G. R. & Buckley, M. R. (Eds.) (1996) Human resources management:

Perspectives, context, functions, and outcomes, 3rd ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ:

Prentice-Hall.

 

Foster-Fishman, P. G. & Keys, C. B. (1997). The person/environment dynamics of

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