UBPL 735: Site Planning

Syllabus – Spring 2008

Graduate Program in Urban Planning

University of Kansas

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Location: Room 308 Marvin Hall (Tuesdays) and

Room 216 Marvin Hall (Thursdays)

Class # 68401

 

Bonnie J. Johnson, Ph.D., AICP

Office: 315 Marvin Hall

Office Hours: Mondays 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Or by appointment

Office phone: (785) 864-7147

Email: bojojohn@ku.edu (Best way to contact me.)

 

Purpose and Goals of the Course

 

This course should probably be called "Site Plan Analysis" because its purpose is to start you on the path of becoming a "site analyst" or trained observer and critic of how sites are designed and programmed (used). The course is doing more than teaching site plan review (taking city guidelines and applying them), but it is not going to bring you up to the level of "site planner." For example, landscape architects go to school for five years or more and they still have to learn a great deal of site planning on the job. However, in one semester we can delve into these big questions: What makes great places? What makes great neighborhoods? and What makes great streets? As we get into these questions we will learn about the process behind the design of sites and how to use technical and artistic skills to steer development in the direction of "greatness."

 

This is not to say that you will not be creating a "site plan." To try to understand what a site planner or designer goes through, each of you will be designing a specific site. You will be creating a "conceptual site plan" poster for a client.

 

Planning is all about communication and while other planning courses concentrate on the written word, this class will focus on building visual communication capabilities.

 

There are no prerequisites for this course.

 

Books and Other Readings

 

Books to purchase:

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press.

 

It should be available at the KU Bookstore. Members of the American Planning Association can order it from their website ( www.planning.org ) and get a discount.

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam.

 

Other Readings:

 

Additional readings will be on Blackboard under "Course Documents" or handed out in class.

 

Recommended Supplies

 

-      Rolling Parallel Ruler (12")

-      Pencils (Ebony, 2B or softer)

-      Sharpie Pen

-      Fine point felt tip pen

-      Eraser

-      Hand pencil sharpener

-      Engineer's scale (not an architect's scale or meter scale)

-      Colored pencils – Prismacolor or other brand easy to erase, 12 or more assorted colors including Canary Yellow. Apple Green, Olive Green, True Blue, Parma Violet, Poppy Red, Orange, Light Umber, and Black

-      General purpose template

-      Roll of white or yellow tracing paper (12" or 24")

-      Paper – can be drawing pad or just copy paper

 

Format and Responsibilities

 

If you miss class on a regular basis or for an extended period, please contact me as soon as possible. Unexplained absences will impact your class participation grade.

 

Please note that late assignments will only be accepted for full credit if there is a verifiable illness, family emergency, or funeral. Unexcused late assignments will be marked off 15% for every day they are late. Assignments will not be accepted via email unless there is some verifiable illness or emergency.

 

The Office of Disability Resources (DR), 22 Strong Hall, 785-864-2620 (v/tty), coordinates accommodations and services for KU students with disabilities. If you have a disability for which you may request accommodation in KU classes and have not contacted DR, please do so as soon as possible. Please also contact me privately in regard to this course.

 


Grades

 

The final grade for this course will consist of the following:

 

5%       Class Participation (attendance)

5%       Class Participation

In Class Exercises

Camp Shalom Conceptual Site Plan Poster – Draft (Due May 8)

7.5%    Drawing Exercises

1st 3 Drawings (Due Feb. 5)

Upside down Drawing (Due Feb. 26)

Edges Drawing (Due March 27)

5%       Camp Shalom Programming Description (Part of Final Poster) (Due March 4)

10%     Camp Shalom Site Analysis (Part of Final Poster) (Due March 13)

10%     Camp Shalom Farm/Ranch Materials/Inspirations Poster (Part of Final Poster) (Due Apr. 8)

7.5%    Camp Shalom Drawing from Photo (Part of Final Poster) (Due Apr. 17)

10%     Camp Shalom Concept Development Plan (Part of Final Poster) (Due Apr. 24)

20%     Take Home Test – Great Places, Neighborhoods, & Streets (Due May 6)

20%     Camp Shalom Conceptual Site Plan Poster – Final (Due May 14)

100%

 

The final grades for the course will be converted to letter grades as follows: 100-93 (A), 92-90 (A-), 89-87 (B+), 86-83 (B), 82-80 (B-), 79-77 (C+), 76-73 (C), 72-70 (C-), 69-67 (D+), 66-63 (D), 62-60 (D-), less than 60 (F).

 

Class Participation

 

A sign-in sheet will be passed around to track attendance (you have four free, unexcused absences - use them wisely). You will get full credit for attendance if you come to 26 classes. Excused absences are illnesses with a doctor's note, funerals or family emergencies with appropriate documentation, or participating in university activities (conferences, etc.) with a sponsor's note.

 

In addition to attendance, class participation will consist of participating in in-class exercises. Remember – it is all about trying and not giving up!

 

Assignments

 

The drawing exercises are from the Betty Edwards book. They are designed to show that anyone can draw. These exercises are intended to improve your drawing skills but also allow you to be creative. Similar to the in-class exercises, this grade will hinge on trying, not on the quality of your drawings. Despite Betty's best efforts, some of us are better at drawing than others! I just want you to give the exercises a good try!

 

The main assignment for this class is creating a conceptual site plan poster for our client, Camp Shalom. Notice that the components of the poster are divided up through the semester. In this way you will get a little done at a time and you will get feedback on the components before the final product is due. Certain class sessions are dedicated to Arc GIS, Photoshop, and InDesign to make completing the poster easier. Also, we will be getting guidance from a design professional who knows all about how to create effective posters.

 

Test

 

There will be a take home test where you will be asked to answer a few essay questions. You will be able to use your books, class readings, and other scholarly works as resources. Use in-text citations and a standard style for references.

 

This test requires writing that must be your own work with appropriate use and citation of other authors. Passing off someone else's writing as your own is considered student misconduct. Any instance of plagiarism on this test will result in a grade of "0." As we've seen with recent big time historians, plagiarism can happen even when we think we have taken the appropriate precautions. To avoid any problems with plagiarism, check out this KU Writing Center website that has links to topics such as, "What is Plagiarism? and Why do people do it?" and "Examples of Plagiarism – and how to avoid it" http://www.writing.ku.edu/students/guides.shtml#2 .

 

Course Outline and Weekly Schedule

 

Please note that there may be adjustments to the readings and schedule as we go along. We will have guest speakers and their schedules may change so we need to be flexible.

 

1/17 Week 1 Thursday: Introductions and Expectations

 

No Readings

 

What makes a great place?

What makes a great neighborhood?

What makes a great street?

 

Handouts = Readings for 1/22 and 1/24

 

1/22 Week 2a Tuesday: What's it all about?

 

Who's our client?

 

Readings

 

Carmona, Matthew, and Steve Tiesdell, eds. 2007. Section Five: The visual dimension. Urban Design Reader. New York, NY: Architectural Press, pgs. 177-207.

 

 

 

 

1/24 Week 2b Thursday: Site Planning – Knowing your way around

 

Visualizing Building Size

 

Readings

 

Netter, Edith M. 1992. Site Plan Review and Approval Processes (Part I). Zoning and Planning Law Report 15 (10):73-80.

 

Craighead, Paula M. 1991. Visualizing Space. The Hidden Design in Land Use Ordinances. Portland, ME: USM New England Studies Program, pgs. 12 - 16.

 

1/29 Week 3a Tuesday: What makes "art"? NOTE LOCATION

 

**Meet in the Lobby of the Spencer Art Museum (west of the Kansas Union)**

 

Readings

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 1 Drawing and the Art of Bicycle Riding. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pages 1 – 10).

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 2 The Drawing Exercises: One Step at a Time. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pages 11 – 26)

 

1/31 Week 3b Thursday: National "teach-in" on Global Climate Change

 

Building Location and Sun Exposure

 

Readings

 

Simonds, John Ormsbee, and Barry W. Starke. 2006. Chapter 1 The Human Habitat. Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Environmental Planning and Design. Fourth ed. New York City, NY: McGraw-Hill (pages 1 – 18).

 

Simonds, John Ormsbee, and Barry W. Starke. 2006. Chapter 2 Climate. Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Environmental Planning and Design. Fourth ed. New York City, NY: McGraw-Hill (pages 19 - 32).

 

2/5 Week 4a Tuesday: Poster Design

 

**Due – First Three Drawings – Edwards Exercises**

 

Reflect on working for our client.

 

Guest – How to design an effective poster.

 

2/7 Week 4b Thursday: Land Planning and Design Process

 

Maximizing Building Size

 

Readings

 

Lynch, Kevin, and Gary Hack. 1984. part – Chapter 1 The Art of Site Planning. Site Planning. Third ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (pages 1 – 12).

 

LaGro, James A., Jr. 2007. part – Chapter 1 Shaping the Built Environment Site Analysis: A Contextual Approach to Sustainable Land Planning and Site Design. Second ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., pgs. 12-21.

 

2/12 Week5a Tuesday: Site Inventory (Physical)

 

Percent Slope

 

Readings

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 3: The Constraints of Slope on Land Development. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 22 - 34).

 

2/14 Week 5b Thursday: Programming and Site Selection

 

Guests – Our clients, Members of the Camp Shalom Board of Directors

 

Readings

 

Camp Shalom Design Specifications

 

Eric Anderson's Camp Shalom Land Use Plan

 

Steiner, Frederick, and Kent Butler. 2007. part – Parks and Open Space Planning and Urban Design Standards. Student ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., pgs. 207-211.

 

2/19 Week6a Tuesday: Camp Shalom - the Planner's Point-of-View

 

Guests – Planners

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 3 Your Brian: The Right and Left of It. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pgs. 27 – 48)

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 4 Crossing Over: Experiencing the Shift from Left to Right. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pgs. 49 – 66).

 

2/21 Week 6b Thursday: Camp Shalom - the Engineer's Point-of-View

 

Guests – Engineers

 

Readings

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 4: Water Supply and Distribution. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 35 - 44).

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 5: Wastewater Management. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 45 - 60).

 

2/26 Week 7a Tuesday: ArcGIS Training – NOTE LOCATION

 

**Due – Edwards Exercise – Upside Down Drawing**

 

**Meet in 305 Marvin**

 

Guest – How to use ArcGIS to show areas and building footprints

 

Readings

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 2: Maps. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 9 – 21).

 

2/28 Week 7b Thursday: Camp Shalom – the Architect's Point-of-View

 

Guests - Architects

 

Pollock, Leslie. 1991. The Red Penciler's Guide to Site Plan Review. Planning 57 (4):22-26.

 

3/4 Week 8a Tuesday: Site Inventory (Biological) – An Ecological Survey

 

**Due – Camp Shalom Programming Description**

 

Guest – Looking out for ecological features on a site.

 

3/6 Week b8 Thursday: Site Inventory (Cultural)

 

Guest - The Farm/Ranch Theme and entry design ideas

 

Reflection on working for our client

 

Readings

 

Linn County Information

 

Simonds, John Ormsbee, and Barry W. Starke. 2006. part – Chapter 9 Site Development. Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Environmental Planning and Design. Fourth ed. New York City, NY: McGraw-Hill, (pages 125 - 127).

 

3/11 Week 9a Tuesday: Site Analysis – Use of Symbols

 

Landscape Video

 

Readings

 

On Reserve in Hatch Reading Room and at Anschutz Library -

Reid, Grant W. 1993. From Concept to Form in Landscape Design. New York, NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

 

3/13 Week 9b Thursday: Site Analysis in Action

 

**Due – Camp Shalom Site Analysis**

 

Guest – Landscape Architect

 

3/18 and 3/20 Week 10: Spring Break – No Class

 

3/25 Week 11a Tuesday: Photoshop Training 1 - NOTE LOCATION

 

**Meet in 305 Marvin**

 

Guest – Graphics quality

 

Readings

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 7 Perceiving the Shape of a Space: The Positive Aspects of Negative Space. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pgs. 115 – 136).

 

3/27 Week 11b Thursday: Photoshop Training 2 - NOTE LOCATION

 

**Due – Edwards Exercise Edges Drawing**

 

**Meet in 305 Marvin**

 

Guest – Altering graphics

 

4/1 Week 12a Tuesday: InDesign Training 1 - NOTE LOCATION

 

**Meet in 305 Marvin**

 

Guest – Using InDesign to make a poster

 

4/3 Week 12b Thursday: Concept Development – What makes Great Places? – Parking?

 

Parking Lot Design

 

Readings

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 11: Parking. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 125 - 135).

 

4/8 Week 13a Tuesday: Poster Critique

 

**Due - Camp Shalom Farm/Ranch Theme Poster**

 

Guest – Review of Farm/Ranch Theme Posters

 

4/10 Week 13b Thursday: InDesign Training

 

Guest – Refining skills in creating a large poster

 

Readings

 

Edwards, Betty. 1999. Chapter 11 Drawing on the Beauty of Color. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam (pgs. 229 – 246).

 

Leggitt, Jim. 2002. Drawing Shortcuts: Developing Quick Drawing Skills Use Today's Technology. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (pgs. 61 – 62).

 

4/15 Week 14a Tuesday: Concept Development – What makes Great Places? - Space

 

Human Scale

 

Readings

 

American Planning Association website on Great Public Spaces -

            http://www.planning.org/greatplaces/publicspacesguidelines.htm

 

Hedman, Richard, and Andrew Jaszewski. 1984. part - Spatial Definition. Fundamentals of Urban Design. Washington, DC: Planners Press (pgs. 52 - 77).

 

Todd, Kim W. 1985. part – Space. Site, Space, and Structure. New York, NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. (pages 42 – 43).

 

 

4/17 Week 14b Thursday: Concept Development – What makes Great Neighborhoods?

 

**Due Drawing from Photo for Camp Shalom Poster**

 

Readings

 

Hinshaw, Mark. 2008. Great Neighborhoods. Planning 74 (1):6-11.

 

Kendig, Lane. 2004. Chapter 2 Monotony. Too Big, Boring, or Ugly: Planning and Design Tools to Combat Monotony, the Too-big House, and Teardowns, Report No. 528, Planning Advisory Service. Chicago, IL: American Planning Association (pgs. 15 – 38).

 

Kendig, Lane. 2004. Chapter 3 Monopoly-Set Houses. Too Big, Boring, or Ugly: Planning and Design Tools to Combat Monotony, the Too-big House, and Teardowns, Report No. 528, Planning Advisory Service. Chicago, IL: American Planning Association (pgs. 39 – 46).

 

4/22 Week 15a Tuesday: Concept Development in Action - NOTE LOCATION

 

**Meet in 306 Marvin**

 

Guest– Landscape Architect

 

4/24 Week 15b Thursday: Concept Development – What makes Great Neighborhoods?

 

**Due Camp Shalom Concept Development Plan**

 

Readings

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 15: Neighborhood Planning. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 177 - 186).

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 18: Single-Family Subdivisions. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 214 – 223).

 

Jarvis, Frederick D. 1993. part - Site Planning and Community Design for Great Neighborhoods. Washington, D.C.: Home Builders Press (pgs. 2-5 and 48-57).

 

4/29 & 5/1 Week 16: No Class - APA Conference – But There are Readings!

 

What makes a Great Street?

 

Readings

 

Knack, Ruth. 2008. Great Streets: What makes them special? Planning 74 (1):12-17.

 

Anderson, Larz T. 2000. Chapter 16: Street Design in Residential Areas. Planning the Built Environment. Chicago, IL: Planners Press (pages 214 – 223).

 

 

Burden, Dan, with Michael Wallwork, Ken Sides, Ramon Trias, and Harrison Bright Rue. 2002. part – Part III, What Are Healthy Streets? Street Design Guidelines for Health Neighborhoods. Sacramento, CA: Local Government Commission (pages 12 – 22).

 

5/6 Week 17a Tuesday: Wrapping Up!

 

**Due – Take Home Test – Great Places, Neighborhoods, & Streets

 

Red Lining Plans

 

5/8 Week 17b: Thursday: Poster Critique

 

**Due Draft of Camp Shalom Conceptual Site Plan Poster**

 

Guests – Review of drafts

 

5/14 Week 18 Wednesday: Final – Presentations of Conceptual Site Plans for Client

1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 216 Marvin Hall (the Jury Room)

 

The End.                               

 

(Do you now see the world with more of an analyst's eye?)