English 106

First Year Writing Seminar II: Academic Research & Writing

 

 

Course Description

The course provides sustained experience with the research and writing tasks common in the academy. Students will explore various academic genres, with particular focus on learning to undertake academic inquiry: engage in close reading; incorporate research into their writing; and document sources. Peer response, reflection and revision are emphasized through a summative course portfolio. Pre-Requisite: EN 105 or equivalent.

 

Core Learning Outcomes

 

1.     Process: Apply writing processes, collaborative strategies, and effective academic research practices to participate in academic discourse.

2.     Focus: Maintain a controlling idea/thesis for a variety of academic genres.

3.     Development: Apply strategies for developing academic arguments across the disciplines, including conducting research and incorporating culturally diverse perspectives.

4.     Rhetorical Strategies: Consider the rhetorical situations faced by academic writers to respond appropriately in both writing and research.

5.     Conventions: Use common formats and conventions (e.g., research, structure, documentation, tone, mechanics) for various genres of academic discourse.

 

Core Assessment (i.e., description of the assessment instrument that should be used at the end of the term to assess student's performance on the CLOs)

 

Every class has a Core Assessment, which is one assignment common to all sections of the course. The Core Assessment for EN106 is a portfolio. The writing portfolio for EN 106 asks students to demonstrate advanced composing skills (focus, development, organization, and mechanics) and facility with writing processes, genres, and conventions specific to academic rhetorical situations. Compiled at the end of the term, each portfolio will contain, at a minimum, the following: one deeply revised academic essay, one reflective essay, and artifacts that illustrate the student's writing process. The academic essay should be of final-draft quality, and should demonstrate a thorough mastery of the writing and research strategies learned through the first year writing seminar sequence. Topics for reflective essays are open, but students should consider discussing their development as academic writers, their concurrent writing in other courses, and/or strengths, challenges, and opportunities for improvement, as revealed in the complete portfolio. Reflective essays should be significantly developed and of final-draft quality. The choice of artifacts and their arrangement belongs to each student. The Core Assessment will account for 20% of the final course grade.

 

 

EN 106 Core Assessment Rubric (i.e., the rubric used to assess student performance on the portfolio - and may be adapted as a grading rubric for other assignments)

 

CLO

Exceeds Expectation

Meets Expectation

Does Not Meet Expectation

Process:
Apply writing processes, collaborative strategies, and effective academic research practices to participate in academic discourse.

Student demonstrates clear evidence of using process and social/collaborative practices to draft, revise, edit, and proof-read.

Student shows some evidence of using process and collaboration to write.

Student does not demonstrate the use of process or collaboration.

Focus:
Maintain a controlling idea/thesis for a variety of academic genres.

The focus, or thesis, of each student essay is not only clear but insightful, memorable, and fully supported.

Student's writing consistently has a clear focus, though it may not always be unique or insightful.

Student essays are either unfocused or feature commonplace or generic theses.

Development:
Apply strategies for developing academic arguments across the disciplines, including conducting research and incorporating culturally diverse perspectives.

Student essays demonstrate successful and deliberate development strategies, especially in the use of research and culturally diverse perspectives, such that each essay seems fully argued and complete.

Student essays demonstrate some use of development strategies but show room for further development in research, argument, or incorporating diverse perspectives.

Student essays are unsupported, needlessly repetitive, unclear, or otherwise underdeveloped.

Rhetorical Strategies:
Consider the rhetorical situations faced by academic writers to respond appropriately in both writing and research.

Student consistently displays an awareness of audience, context, and genre, and responds creatively and appropriately.

Student shows some awareness of rhetorical situations and responds appropriately.

Student shows little awareness of rhetorical situations.

Conventions:
Use common formats and conventions (e.g., research, structure, documentation, tone, mechanics) for various genres of academic discourse.

Student essays make meaningful use of standard formats and conventions in structure, tone, documentation, and mechanics. Although a few mechanical errors may be present, they do not impede understanding.

Student essays are relatively standard in terms of format, documentation, and mechanics. Errors may be present, but do not impede understanding.

Student essays use inappropriate tone or structure, contain mechanical errors that impede understanding, or show serious deficiencies in terms of documentation (e.g., no Works Cited or References page).