(Re)imagining Humanities Teaching: Innovations in Course Design

Preliminary program

 

 

Thursday, June 8

 

Pre-conference workshops

 

1:30 - 3 pm

 

Partnering with Students - Peter Felten

 

1:30 - 3 pm

 

Close Reading of Students' Work - Glenn Lester

 

 

 

Opening Plenary

 

4 - 5:30 pm

 

Humanities Teaching and Humane Inquiry - Peter Felten

As scientists and social scientists have developed increasingly sophisticated tools to study brains and memory, we have come to better understand learning and teaching. This experimental work, however, has (further) marginalized the means and ends of humanities teaching and humanistic inquiry into learning. This conference, and this talk, aim to re-center the ways of meaning-making that are the foundation of the humanities, exploring how and why humanists can understand the complexity and wholeness of student learning. Rather than offering a prescription for teaching and inquiry, I will pose "what if?" questions in the hope of provoking conversations about the tensions, paradoxes, and possibilities of a more humane vision of inquiry and education.

 

 

Reception & Portfolio Displays

 

5:30 - 6:30 pm

 

Portfolio posters

Round Table Discussion - Peter Felton

Inquiry into teaching in collaboration with students (workshop topic), and how are humanities questions related to teaching inquiry (plenary topic).

Appetizers and drinks

 

Dinner

On your own

 

 

 


 

Friday, June 9

 

Presentations/Discussions

 

8:30 - 9:15 am

 

Increasing Student Engagement in Greek and Roman Mythology - Emma Scioli

Emma will discuss the motivation behind the redesign of the course Introduction to Greek and Roman Mythology, share some of the assignments developed for the redesign over the three years of the project, and present an assessment of the impact of the redesign upon student engagement and learning.

Ancient Greek in a Hybrid Format - Pamela Gordon

Sharing information from two years of experience, Pam will discuss the process of transferring in-class exercises and readings to the online format, and present her ideas about the impact of this shift upon student learning.

Student Learning in the Hybrid Latin Classroom - Scott McMickle

Scott will discuss the shifting role of the teacher from lecturer to hands-on facilitator of learning, as well as the differing expectations for student learning in a hybrid course.

8:30 - 9:15 am

 

Adaptation as Course Topic and Methodology - Jane Barnette

In this presentation, Jane will share strategies for adapting assessments and rubrics to meet the shifting demands of new assignments, especially those rooted in nonfiction and popular culture.

Using Images to Support Reading and Writing: From Reading Comprehension to Writing Ethical Arguments through Visualization - Sue Hum

In this presentation, Sue focuses on the ways in which students can better comprehend abstract theoretical concepts by creating and designing visual representations, thus rendering those concepts concrete and accessible.

8:30 - 9:15 am

 

Teaching Writing Within the Music Discipline–Brad Osborn

Brad will share strategies he uses to make courses relevant and accessible to a wide variety of students.

Writing About Community Issues in First Year Writing - Glenn Lester

Instead of asking students to conduct generalized research projects that emerge from course readings or their majors, Glenn asked students to engage with local issues faced by authentic communities they belong to. Over three semesters, he's developed and refined this approach, and will share his results.

 

 

Break

 

 

 

9:30 - 10:15 am

 

Heritage Inquiry and Digital Project: Nineteenth-Century Cemetery with a Digital Presence - Lisa Hermesen

Lisa will discuss a newly formed four-year undergraduate degree program in the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences.

Active Learning Retrofit: Cultivating Students' Creative Confidence via Pop-Up Webinars and Low-Fidelity 2D Digital Prototyping - Sidneyeve Matrix

Sidneyeve will discuss the changes she's brought to her online and on-campus courses on digital culture, communication, creativity, and commerce.

9:30 - 10:15 am

 

Teaching Students the Craft of Journalism through Writing Workshops - Katie Clune

Katie will discuss a project that centers on the use of interactive writing labs in Introduction to Journalism, a survey course designed to teach students basic journalism skills.

Scaffolding the Interdisciplinary Research Experience in LE300: Ethics and Psychology of Humor - Adam Potthast

In this presentation, Adam will describe the redesign of a standard research paper assignment in a general education interdisciplinary capstone course.

9:30 - 10:15 am

 

"Self-Watching" - Brian Shawver

Brian will present an investigation of how and why a writing instructor might prioritize analytical "self-watching" in a classroom over more traditional reflective activities such as portfolio essays and peer workshops.

Student Self-Annotation as a Strategy for Promoting Critical Thinking - John Kerrigan

John will share an innovative means of stimulating students' independent learning through a Self-Annotation assignment designed to prompt them to slow down, pause, and reflect back on their own work, to develop the ability to see their work and themselves through a metacognitive, teacherly lens.

 

Break

 

10:30 - 11:30 am

Round Table Discussion: Digital Humanities and Digital Teaching

10:30 - 11:30 am

HOLD OPEN for participant generated topics

10:30 - 11:30 am

Round Table Discussion: Writing in the Context of Field and Goal

 

 

 

 


 

Luncheon & Plenary

 

12 –1:30 pm

 

Where Scholarship and Teaching Come Together: Small Steps Toward Big Improvements in Student Learning - Pat Hutchings

Concerns about the future of the humanities and their centrality to the undergraduate experience call on us to find new ways to engage students. And many humanities faculty--as evidenced by CHRP--are passionate about finding better ways to invite students into the richness of their field. But in the real world of campus life today, with its constant churn of competing priorities, it can be hard to find the time, resources, and community that make pedagogical inquiry and innovation possible. In this session, then, we'll explore a variety of strategies for bringing our skills, habits and values as humanities scholars to the work we do as teachers. Our focus--drawing on your experience in CHRP--will be on concrete, do-able strategies for documenting and reflecting on learning and teaching. The goal of the session is to share and explore such strategies in ways that connect with your own teaching practice and professional development.

 

Break

 

1:45 - 2:30 pm

 

How to Teach Your Expert Process: A Music Theorist's Perspective - Robin Attas

Robin will share various ways that she taught expert processes for music analysis in a second-year music theory class. Participants will use her list of possibilities to reflect and brainstorm ways in which they might apply expert processes in their own teaching.

Promoting Critical Thinking and Analysis in an Undergraduate-Level Art History Course - Maya Stiller

To support students as they develop critical thinking skills in an undergraduate-level art history course, Maya created different types of assignments that function as scaffolding: the team reading, the think piece, and three presentations instead of just one oral presentation. She will share the results of this redesign.

1:45 - 2:30 pm

Teaching Students to See their Own Culture in World Languages Courses - Olivia Choplin, Ketevan Kupatadze & Kristina Meinking

The presenters in this panel will discuss ways in which they integrated strategic metacognition in order to deepen students' critical thinking about culture and to help them understand their own cultural-situatedness.

1:45 - 2:30 pm

 

Teaching the Archive: Modeling Interdisciplinary Inquiry Across the Curriculum - Sheya Jahanbani, Jonathan Hagel & Caroline Boswell

This presentation centers around the question of how to revive the profound relevance of the humanities to students, parents, and policymakers. Sheyda, Jonathan, and Caroline's answer: making what we do as scholars legible to students, modeling interdisciplinary inquiry to enhance engagement in all classes and promote the value of humanities degrees.

How to Brainstorm Pedological Ideas for Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Classroom - Carla Coleman

In this presentation, Carla will discuss ways in which to optimize collaboration within humanities fields.

 

Break

 

2:45 - 3:30 pm

 

Reading for Fun Versus Reading as a Literary Scholar: Moving Students Beyond the Superficial in an Introductory Literature Course - Stacey Kikendall

Stacey will explain innovations she made to her Introduction to Literature course to support students' progress as analytical readers without causing them to lose their enjoyment in reading.

Teaching Shakespeare in a Disruptive Classroom - Jon Lamb

Do Shakespeare's writings, long considered essential to a good education, have a place amid curricular restructuring, rapidly shifting enrollment patterns, an increasingly diverse and self-aware student population, and massive cultural shift? Jon will argue that a Shakespeare course must adapt to the changing college world.

2:45 - 3:30 pm

 

Objectifying the Subjective: Evaluating Students' Self-Reflection Assignments - LaKresha Graham

LaKresha will address how, in an assignment that requires subjectivity on the part of students, to include objective ways of evaluating and grading students' work.

CHRP and BVA Readers: Opportunities Afforded by Reading Course Portfolios for Community and the Value of Sharing

2:45 - 3:30 pm

 

Interdisciplinary Team Teaching Across the Arts/ Humanities and Sciences: Impact on Student and Faculty Perspectives on Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing - Sarah Bunnell, Laurel Anderson, Paula White & Aimee Knupsky

This symposium will present a series of linked papers focusing on a multi-site, multi-course project exploring the impact of interdisciplinary, team-taught courses across the humanities/arts and sciences on student learning and faculty outcomes.

 

Break

 

3:45 - 4:30 pm

Round Table Discussion: Decoding the Disciplines - Engaging Students in Learning Professional Analytic Skills

3:45 - 4:30 pm

 

Round Table Discussion: What Are the Places in Professional Life for Course Portfolios? How Can the Genre be Developed and Supported?

3:45 - 4:30 pm

Round Table Discussion: Daniel Guberman intro on Great Books, then open discussion on Interdisciplinary courses and programs

 

Dinner

On your own

Saturday, June 10

 

Presentations/Discussions

 

8:30 - 9:15 am

 

Building Community Around Humanities Teaching: Actionable Lessons from the CHRP Project - Kathy Wise & Charlie Blaich

Kathy and Charlie will discuss what appears to have taken place on and across the CHRP campuses to create and sustain shared innovation and exchange of key experiences and lessons about teaching and learning.

Round Table Discussion: How to Generate and Sustain Community Around Teaching

8:30 - 9:15 am

 

Connecting Students to the Past with Condolence Letters - Debra Sheffer

Debra will discuss her goal to help mostly non-history majors make connections between war and culture through the use of the genre of condolence-letter writing, a brief study of the American Civil War, and cultural attitudes toward death - then and now.

Mentoring the Path to Success: Honing Students' Writing Skills Through the Early Semester Intense Tutoring Program - Cecilia Samonte

Cecilia will focus on how Rockhurst University's Learning Center Early Semester Tutoring program helped U.S. history students develop and improve their writing on historical documents.

 

Break

 

9:30 - 10:15 am

 

HOLD: How might course portfolios fit with a teaching quality framework to represent excellent teaching and learning - CU Boulder/BVA readers, presenters

9:30 - 10:15 am

 

Building the Historian's Toolbox - Kim Warren

One of the goals in a history course is to help students learn how to write their own stories about the past. In the process of redesigning a course, Kim will share how she has shifted assignments to allow students to become producers of knowledge as well as consumers of knowledge.

Representing Learning - Making Humanities Thinking Visible - Emily Sallee, Deandra Little, Renee Michael & Andrea Greenhoot, CHRP Project Leaders

 

Break

 

10:30 - 11:30 am

Synthesizing Conversation: Humane Inquiry into Teaching and Learning

Roundtable discussions among participants, followed by sharing experiences, examples, and plans for ongoing inquiry into teaching and learning in humanities. Facilitated by Pat Hutchings